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www.Zune.com/Setup, www.Zune.net/Setup, Zune.com/Setup, Zune.net/Setup

Announcement: How to Set-up Your New Zune MP3 Player II

It seems a lot of people have been checking out the Zune for the past couple years, and now everyone got a new Zune for Christmas! If you happened to get a Zune instead of an iPod, you will probably need to read the manual to get everything setup. You could go the standard route and head to www.zune.net/setup,or be smart and read our guide right here. (A lot of people were having trouble with the standard zune.net/setup instructions.)

(Beforehand, it would help to have a Zune with a freshly charged battery, a PC, a sync cable, and a Windows Live ID, which could be from a hotmail account.)

Zune Setup Step #1: Download Software.

OK, so you still have to go to www.zune.net/setup to download the latest software that you’ll install on your computer.

Zune Setup Step #2: Install Software.

Now, install the software. Just click the installation icon, accept the license agreement, and it gets going.

Zune Setup Step #3: Connect the Zune.

Here comes the tricky part – getting your Zune connected and configured to work with your computer. Start by connecting your Zune to your PC with the included sync cable (when prompted.) Then sync the Zune with the library on your PC. (Just follow a few simple prompts and click the recommended configuration.)

Zune Setup Step #4: Personalize your Zune.

“Tag” the Zune with your screen name and connect it to your Windows Live account (possibly your “@hotmail.com” email.)

Zune Setup Step #5: Buy stuff.

Once your Zune is synced to your computer with the software, then you can load the Zune store, buy Microsoft points, and download music from Zune Marketplace.

* If you get errors or your system crashes during the install, try uninstalling and starting over. Unfortunately these problems happen too often with Microsoft products…

Xbox Music, Zune MarketPlace, Zune Software, Zune.com/Setup

Announcement: Zune Software

Zune software is a digital media manager for your computer. Play and organize your collection, rip and burn CDs, create playlists, sync them to your device… even stream music, movies, podcasts, and pictures over your home wireless network.


The Zune software is the hub for all your entertainment. Enjoy, manage, or share your media in one place. With powerful music discovery tools like Smart DJ and Mixview, you’ll revisit old favorites or discover new ones.

Xbox Music, Zune MarketPlace, Zune Software

Announcement: Zune MarketPlace

Shop Zune Marketplace for millions of songs, videos, podcasts, and TV shows. Search by artist, browse by genre, or choose from over a thousand hand-picked playlists. Found what you like? Just click and buy individual songs, albums, and videos.


Zune unites wireless MP3 players, PC software, an online Marketplace and a Social network together in the ultimate entertainment service.

www.Zune.net, www.Zune.net/Setup, Zune.net/Setup

ZUNE Firmware

According to Microsoft, the most up-to-date firmware version is 4.5 (114) for the Zune HD, which replaces the original player firmware that ships on the device, 4.0 (356). In the case of the Zune 4, 8, 16, 30, 80, and 120 players, the most current player software version is 3.3, which provides compatibility with Zune 4.2. Version 3.3 was primarily a bug fix release and was released on January 26, 2010.

The operating system for the Zune devices is based on the Windows CE kernel for ARM architecture and uses a distribution similar to the Portable Media Center found on the Gigabeat S. Zune’s native file compatible formats are:

  • JPEG for images;
  • WMV (Used by Zune Marketplace)
  • MPEG-4 – supported on all models except the Zune 30 device
  • H.264 – supported on all models except the Zune 30 device
  • Avi video (Xvid) support is included on the Zune HD (firmware versions 4.5 and later).
  • MP3 (used by Zune Marketplace)
  • AAC (unprotected) not AAC (.m4a)
  • WMA Pro (2-channel)
  • WMA Standard (used by Zune Marketplace)
  • WMA lossless

Any formats not compatible with an individual device are automatically transcoded into a compatible format.

The graphical user interface (GUI) (called the “twist interface” by Microsoft) has sections for music, videos, pictures, social, radio, podcasts, marketplace, games and settings. It is said to provide “two-dimensional navigation” for scrolling through items with its directional pad. In the music section, users can add songs to a quick playlist without reconnecting to the desktop software. In the picture section, the background can be customized using any image stored on the device (for viewing) as wallpaper. In the radio section, users can receive and play FM radio internally, with North American, Japanese, and European tuning ranges, and display Radio Data System information (usually artist and song) when available. When artist/song information are available, the device can search for the song in the Zune Marketplace for download or purchase. In the social section, users can broadcast the user’s profile and recent activity to others nearby.

The first updates to the firmware added sharing features (send, community, list nearby Zune users) as described in FCC filings. Firmware 1.1 allowed the device to inherit sharing capabilities described by codename Pyxis. Early firmware releases patched software bugs. About a year later, the much anticipated 2.2 firmware release added support for DVR-MS (Media Center Recorded TV) files, lossless playback, added wireless syncing, and GUI interface improvements.

Zune supports the Windows Media DRM digital rights management system, which is not compatible with other DRM systems and is not part of the PlaysForSure platform or program. Multimedia content is transferred through Media Transfer Protocol (MTP); however, its proprietary MTP extensions (“MTPZ”) place an interoperability barrier between the Zune and previous MTP-based software.

www.Zune.net/Setup, Zune MarketPlace, Zune.net/Setup

WHAT IS ZUNE?PART IV Zune Accessories

The standard Zune devices come with basic headphones and a proprietary USB data cable. The Zune 30 comes with these items as well as a carrying bag, and the Zune 80 model has upgraded “Zune Premium” headphones. Accessories sold separately include:

  • Charging devices (car adapter, AC wall-socket adapters, external battery)
  • I/O adapters (A/V composite, FM transmitters, headphones, USB data cable)
  • Docks (charging, multimedia large speaker, vertical hands-free assist)
  • Protection (glass screen protection, hardened/cushioning material case protection)
  • Carrying cases (standard issue, armband type, and belt clip)
  • Replacement parts and upgrades (battery, hard drive, LCD, etc.)

Among the firms that make Zune accessories are Microsoft, Altec Lansing, Belkin, Digital Lifestyle Outfitters (DLO), Dual Electronics, Griffin Technology, Harman Kardon, JBL, Integrated Mobile Electronics, Jamo International, Klipsch Audio Technologies, Logitech, Monster Cable Products Inc., Speck, Targus, Kicker and VAF Research.

www.Zune.net/Setup, Zune.net/Setup


Zune is a digital media brand owned by Microsoft which includes a line of portable media players, a digital media player software for Windows machines, a music subscription service known as a ‘Zune Music Pass’, music and video streaming for the Xbox 360 via the Zune Software, music, TV and movie sales, and the media software for Windows Phone. Zune Music Pass is for Music only and as of October, 2011 was reduced to $9.99 (USD) a month for unlimited music rental and music video streaming.

In October 2011, Microsoft announced the discontinuation of all Zune hardware, encouraging users to transition to Windows Phone.

First generation

The first-generation Zune device was created by Microsoft in close cooperation with Toshiba, which took the design of the Gigabeat S and redeveloped it under the name Toshiba 1089 as registered with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) starting in 2006. Xbox 360 overseer J Allard ran the project, codenamed “Argo,” staffed with Xbox and MSN Music Store developers who worked on “Alexandria”, finalized as Zune Marketplace.Both products were later united under the Zune brand name in the U.S. market.

At midnight on December 31, 2008, many first generation Zune 30 models froze. Microsoft stated that the problem was caused by the internal clock driver written by Freescale and the way the device handles a leap year. An intermediate “fix” was to drain the device’s battery and then recharge after 12 noon GMT on January 1, 2009.

The first generation and later Zune devices included a number of social features, including the ability to share songs with other Zune users wirelessly. Songs that had been transferred over wi-fi could then be played three times over three days.